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April 4 & 5, 2020
Parade Day is April 4th!
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About the Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade
The first Kinetic Sculpture Race rolled down the road in 1969 in Ferndale, California, and later grew to include national cutting-edge race events in Humbolt, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Port Townshend.

Since then, many communities have joined the kinetic craze, offering their own variation of these floats-with-moving-parts-parades. Teams build human powered vehicles that must complete a course that goes over land and various other obstacles (both intended and otherwise).Teams are scored on how fast they complete the course, how well/interesting their craft is put together, the “funness” of their theme/costumes, and numerous other qualities as judged by various individuals who have been deemed experts in their kinetics related field of study.

Creators spend months designing and building their sculptures, then must complete a course over terrain that varies from muddy roads to swift-flowing rivers.
 
Key West Art & Historical Society, steward to the island’s cultural heritage, took the region’s laid-back attitude and rebel ingenuity into account when kicking off its own Parade in May 2016, eliminating the “race” component from the mix but adding the element of “art bikes” for the town known for its pedaling revelers.  

Arising from a long-percolating idea of former KWAHS staff member Gerri Sidoti, which won the support of a prestigious Knight Arts Challenge grant—which rewards the best and most innovative ideas in the arts—and the additional support of the Helmerich Trust, the Community Foundation of the Florida Keys, and the Monroe County Tourist Development Council, the Papio Kinetic Sculpture and Art Bike Parade was set in motion…
 
Inspired by and named for the late Keys artist Stanley Papio, a humorous  metal-artist who explored the value of recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty, the parade presents human-powered mobile sculptures that start off at the Custom House Museum and travel down the length of Duval Street to the southernmost end of it.

While none of Papio’s sculptures were intended to move, the parade reflects his rebel approach to art and life.

Artists, builders, and assemblers will put their creativity and engineering genius to play in the creation of Kinetic Sculpture Floats and Art Bikes.  Small and simple or elegantly engineered, teams of any number and age are welcome to enter this pedaled or pushed sculpture parade; for those requiring a bit of inspiration visit our gallery of past Papio ingenuity: HERE!

 The Papio Kinetic Sculpture Parade supported in part by The Knight Foundation Knight Arts Challenge, The Helmerich Trust, the Community Foundation of the Florida Keys, and the Monroe County Tourist Development Council.


Five Reasons to Join the Fun…


1.     LET’S GET KINETIC!
It’s a family-friendly, art-inspired, human-powered, mobile sculpture and art-bike parade! Think art with parts that move. Watch the one-hour cavalcade wind down Duval Street, or BE in the parade. Register here:
 
2.     NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY.
No need to be the next Stanley Papio or Theo Jansen to make your own Kinetic Sculpture Float or Art Bike—some creative inclination mixed with a dash of kinetic savvy will do. Bust out with your own human-powered “Strandbeest” or pedal a cruiser in your best tutu with your toddler twins in tow— it’s all good. Not sure how to begin? Visit our gallery of past Papio parades here for some inspiration.
 
3.     WHO IS PAPIO, YOU ASK?  
That would be the late Key Largo folk artist Stanley Papio,  rebellious welder-turned artist who explored recycled materials long before it was hip to be rusty. Papio transformed his collected metal— old cars, washing machines and other metal appliances piled high in his yard — into extraordinary pieces of art, many of them offering comical and caustic commentary on neighbors and naysayers.

 4.     PUT SOME FUNK INTO YOUR JUNK.  
Human Powered Kinetic Sculpture Floats and Art Bikes can be simple, whimsical, futuristic, or fantastical—the only requirement is that they are physically moved by you (and/or a teammate(s)). Recycling is highly encouraged, wit and humor loudly applauded. Welding, wheels, gears, wire, or glue?—it’s entirely up to you!
 
5.     IT ALL BEGINS AND ENDS WITH A PARTY.
Everyone can get kinetic after the parade. There will be revelry and fanfare at the Southernmost Pocket Park on Duval Street with awards, drinks, food, and more!


Want to find more opportunities to flex your creative muscle? Take a look at the other cities kinetic sculpture parades below!

Baltimore, MD
 www.kineticbaltimore.com

The Baltimore Kinetic Sculpture Race (also known as the East Coast Championship) began in 1999 when Rebecca Hoffberger, founder of the American Visionary Art Museum, heard about the World Championship on television. She wanted to bring the race to Baltimore, and worked with Hobart to do it. Since the beginning, Theresa Segreti has led AVAM’s sponsorship of the race. For the first year, there were just six entries. AVAM built the Cha Cha Bird, the most impressive sculpture that year that served as inspiration to others.  Two years later in 2001, the Chicken was rebuilt as Fifi the giant pink poodle—and has been the race’s mascot every year since.

Eureka, CA
The Kinetic Grand Championship is a 3-day, 42-mile bicycle race over land, sand, mud and water. Many refer to the Kinetic Grand Championship as the “Triathlon of the Art World.”

Day 1 of the Kinetic Grand Championship starts on the Plaza in Arcata, California at the noon whistle every Memorial Day weekend. The racers take off to the Manila dunes, where they race through miles of sand to the great and inevitable “Deadman’s Drop.” Then on to Eureka’s downtown gazebo.

Day 2 starts in Eureka at the waterfront on the Humboldt Bay, where brave Kinetic Pilots race their crafts through the water (most float). Then back on land where kinetic sculptures go up Hookton Hill, a 1 mile-7% incline and decline. Day 2 ends with a private campout for racers and volunteers only.

Day 3 starts from the mouth of the Eel River, through Morgan slough and onto dry land. Racers cross the finish line on Ferndale’s historic Mainstreet, where racers park and head up to the Final Awards Dinner at Ferndale’s Fireman’s Hall.

Corvallis, OR
This is no ordinary race. Graand Kinetic Challenge teams are out to prove that their sculpture is the best--best in art, best in engineering, best in speed, best in pageantry, and best all around!  Check here for 2013 Awards!

Their biggest test is the race itself and what a course it is! Racers must ride over 10 miles of city streets, over a man-made sand dune, across 3000 feet of sun-dried, clay pasture, through 200 feet of deep, thick, sticky mud, and down 2 miles of the Willamette River. All of this under pedal power with no help from their friends (or spectators)!

Denver, CO
Teams build human powered vehicles that must complete a course that goes over land, water, and various other obstacles (both intended and otherwise). Teams are scored on how fast they complete the course, how well/interesting their craft is put together, the “funness” of their theme/costumes, and numerous other qualities as judged by various individuals who have been deemed experts in their kinetics related field of study.